Shipping Container Business Complex Goes up in London

Shipping Container Business Complex Goes up in London

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Pop Brixton is a local business campus, which will soon open its doors in London, UK. It will house independent start-ups and small businesses from the area and the project managers estimate that it will create about 200 jobs by supporting around 80 local entrepreneurs, as well as create 12 apprenticeships being paid by the London Living Wage. The complex will be set up as a temporary shipping container village.

Pop Brixton will be built using 50 recycled containers, and it was designed by Carl Turner Architects. Shipping containers will be the main building blocks and will yield all the necessary business units, as well as a farm garden and a greenhouse area, along with exhibition space for local artists, workshop space and an event room with seating for more than 200 people. The event space will be constructed by stacking shipping containers three high, and removing their floors and ceilings to create an open and spacious venue. These spaces will be available for rent or for free to local people, artists and organizations.

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Businesses renting space at Pop Brixton will consist mainly of independent start-ups. They will be chosen based on their area of business as well as on the benefits they bring to the local community. The village is considered temporary since it is occupying a lot that is slated for redevelopment by the city council later this year. The good thing about using shipping containers to build it is that it can be relocated much more easily than another type of structure would.

Judging from the renders and construction photos, the shipping containers used were left in more or less their original state, which does offset the carbon footprint of this type of construction. The village is set to open on May 29.

Shipping Container School Built in Africa

Shipping Container School Built in Africa

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Due to being inexpensive and readily available, shipping containers are often used for building affordable housing for the less fortunate. This was recently proven by the Johannesburg, South Africa firm Architecture for a change (A4AC) who used shipping containers to construct a school and community center Malawi. The structure is also capable of operating independent of the grid, since it is equipped with a rainwater harvesting system and a solar power array.

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The Legson Kayira Community Center and Primary School, as the complex is called, measures 4,090 square feet (380 square meters). The designers kept the structure very simple. It is made up of two classrooms and a large central courtyard, along with some bleachers. The school primarily educates children, though the building also houses an adult training center.

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Since insulation is one of the main concerns when using shipping containers as building blocks, the architects needed to find a solution, which would work in the hot climate of South Africa. They opted for a covered canopy-type design, which features a larger covered area that provides shade, as well as open, well-lit and well-ventilated spaces.

The shipping containers used were per-fabricated off-site at A4AC’s workshop in South Africa, and then transported to Malawi. The shipping containers used are supported by a lightweight steel supporting frame and roof. Some of the sides of the containers were also removed and replaced by louvered walls, which further aids in the natural ventilation.

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Also, the classroom doors can be opened on a hinge, which again aids ventilation, as well as make sit possible to turn an indoor space into a semi-outdoor space if needed. To block out the sun and provide shade, designers used netting. Water is recycled via channels in the sloping roof and kept in water storage tanks. The school is also fitted with a rooftop mounted solar power array, which harvests enough power to provide indoor lighting, and serve all the other power needs of the school.

The school took only about eight weeks to complete. Also, it was designed in such a way that additional shipping containers can be added to expand it, should the need arise. This is yet another great thing about using shipping containers as building blocks.

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CONTAINER ARCHITECTURE (book)

DATOS DEL LIBRO

  • 23.0×23.0cm.
  • Editorial: LEADING INTERNATIONAL KEY SERVICES BARCELONA, S.A.
  • Lengua: ESPAÑOL
  • Encuadernación: Tapa blanda
  • ISBN: 9788496969292
  • Año edicón: 2008
  • Plaza de edición: BARCELONA

SINOPSIS

Jure Kotnik es un joven arquitecto free lance que vive y trabaja en Eslovenia. Ha dedicado los últimos años a la investigación sobre la construcción contemporánea de viviendas, incluida la arquitectura de contenedores.

El autor ha diseñado un sistema de construcción con contenedores, con el cual ganó el premio Trimo de investigación en 2006. Colabora con varios arquitectos en proyectos de distintos tipos de arquitectura.

Incluye proyectos conceptuales (estos proyectos fueron los primeros en explorar la arquitectura de contenedores y demostraron que una caja de acero puede ser utilizada en un ámbito diferente al del transporte), viviendas (el abanico de casas hechas con contenedores es amplio, ofrece espacios pequeños como refugios hasta aldeas y grandes edificios de apartamentos), y edificios públicos (tienen especial relevancia en la historia).