Container Village for Haiti

Pop-Up Village for Haiti Made From 900 Shipping Containers

by Bridgette Meinholdvilaj vilaj, luck mervil, haiti, shipping container housing, earthquake disaster relief

Haitian Canadian musician Luck Mervil is leading the charge to help rebuild Haiti with houses made from repurposed shipping containers. Mervil is behind the Montreal organization Vilag Vilag, which wants to use 900 shipping containers to build an entirely new village west of Port-au-Prince fit for 5,000 people. The organization aims to build sustainable and long-term housing in Haiti — and eventually elsewhere — with the help of local Haitians.

vilaj vilaj, luck mervil, haiti, shipping container housing, earthquake disaster relief 

Mervil, who has put his own career aside to work on this important project, expects the entire community to cost around $25 million and has been ardently working to raise the funds. The new village will be built on a parcel of previously uninhabited land near Leogane, a coastal city west of Port-au-Prince. A prototype shipping container house was built in Canada in 10 days for between $8,000 and $10,000, and Mervil expects the costs to be much lower in Haiti.

The village will consist of a series of 900 shipping containers grouped together in a grid and separated by open space, parks, and playing fields. Both 40 and 20-foot containers will be used to construct durable, long-term and hurricane and earthquake resistant homes. Each home will offer roughly 320 sq feet of living space with running water and bathrooms. The village will also be self-sufficient, with space for companies to set up shop so that villagers can work and support themselves.

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The Farmery: A Pop-Up Urban Farm

The Farmery, urban farm, urban garden, recycled shipping containers, shipping container architecture, cargotecture, raleigh, north carolina, green design, sustainable design, green architecture, shipping container greenhouse

The farmery is a start-up in Raleigh, N.C. that is developing an urban farm and market built from shipping containers and standard greenhouse components. The bottom level serves as a market to sell the crops, and the entire structure is used to grow the crops. The structure uses the inside of the containers to grow mushrooms, and the walls of the containers are covered in growing panels to form living walls where

 

Shipping Container Hotel Slated For Detroit

Collision Works is a Boutique Shipping Container Hotel Slated For Detroit

by Bridgette Meinhold

We just got wind of an exciting new project for Detroit – a boutique shipping container hotel, co-working facility and community event space all wrapped into one. Construction will begin on Collision Works in 2013 and the facility will support the arts and food-centric Eastern Market community. The multidisciplinary design group, which includes New York architecture firm KOOP.AM, wants to provide a place for travelers as well as space for the community to gather, collaborate and forge a new future for Detroit.

Detroit, Collision Works, koop.am, shipping containers, cargotecture, boutique hotel, shipping container home

Collision Works is a project under development to create a boutique hotel and mixed use space for community use. Originally called The Detroit Hotel Project, the facility will have 36 hotels rooms built from shipping containers to create an eclectic, artistic and truly unique space. The designers, aided by the Detroit Collaborative Design Center and KOOP.AM, who has experience building with containers, chose the modular building material because of Detroit’s history with import and export of goods. They also felt that the material was very durable, would cost less, and was faster to build with than standard construction techniques.

The goal of Collision Works is to provide space for travelers coming to Detroit to experience or aid in the renewal. Additionally, the community wants more space in which to gather and collaborate, support mentoring programs and share stories and experiences. Collision Works is working towards B Corporation status and will operate their business with equal interest towards economic, social and environmental success. Currently the group is working on design and pre-construction and construction is slated to begin in the spring of 2013. If all goes as planned, you could book a room for fall of 2013.

Shipping Container Market

Melbourne’s Pop-up Shipping Container Market Mixes Funky Attitude With Reused Materials

by Andrew Michler 

A portable summer market in Melbourne is gearing up for a new season with a fresh new design by Steven Vidovic and Kristina Taranto that focuses on reused materials. The aesthetically eccentric Peoples Market and Flea will feature shipping containers housing shops and eateries and draped in greenery. Artificial trees made from reclaimed lumber and graffiti-strewn walls will create an urban-meets-green vibe that aims to attract folks from all around to shop, eat and relax starting in November.
 pop up market, Melbourne market, green building, container store, milk crate, portable bar, Melbourne graffiti,

Steven Vidovic and Kristina Taranto’s design was selected as the winner of a competition looking for a ‘green theme’ – and they succeeded with a design that is largely made from cast-off materials. Shipping containers will divide spaces within the vacant car lot to create room for a bar, a music scene, an outdoor cinema, and of course shopping. Furniture is mobile for different uses and made from discarded wire spools, tires, barrels, and milk crates – setting up a kind of impromptu environment.

Vidovic and Taranto set the shipping containers at various angles around the lot, and a stack at the front entrance two high creates a gate and signage while providing an overlook on the scene. Stacks and stacks of milk crates along the brick wall spell out the market’s name while creating walls that double as signage for the storefronts.

Quirky trees made from scrap wood deck the open space, asking folks to add a picture or comment to them – they’ll serve as an active community bulletin board. Real trees and flowers are placed in cut barrels. Plants on the roofs of the containers cascade down the sides, creating a cheerful atmosphere while keeping the stores cool. Rain catchment helps keep the plants green. The containers will even be treated with graffiti – a popular and active part of the Melbourne scene.

After the sun drops the market is designed to turn into a music venue or theater, doubling the use of the space and engaging all of the city’s occupants. The beer garden will be open noon until ‘late’.

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Container Mobile Hospital by Kukil Han (Humanity)