Sustainer Homes Made of Shipping Containers

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The company Sustainer Homes recently unveiled a shipping container home that can also be taken completely off-the-grid. According to the company, the main reason for constructing these homes was offering the younger generation a flexible and rent-free living option, which is becoming a must for many. The homes are also mobile and facilitate low-impact living.

Sustainer homes are meant to be primary residences, though they can also easily be used as hotels, holiday accommodations or emergency shelters. They are available in various sizes, ideal for one to two people. The basic version measures 323 sq ft (30 sq m) and can be purchased for about $82,500 (€75,000). They also have larger, family-sized containers available, while they are also currently developing offices, as well as container homes that can be deployed in various different climates.

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Repurposed containers are used to construct these homes, while the interiors are made out of ECOboard, which is a low-energy material made out of pressed grass. The containers are heated via a heat pump and sustainable materials are used for insulation. The homes are also fitted with a solar array and wind turbines for energy production. Using both of these technologies, the company estimates each container is capable of producing about 5,000 kWh of electricity per year, which should be enough to cover the energy requirements of the inhabitants. The containers are also equipped with a 20 kWh battery system. In future, they also plan on integrating this system with the Toon smart thermostat and create an app that will monitor battery level, solar array energy production levels, energy usage and forecast the weather.

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The drinking water comes from collected rainwater that is filtered to Dutch drinking water standards. The used water is also filtered using a helophyte filter and then returned to the ground. Toilet waste is treated to eliminate the bacteria and then composted.

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The prototype of the first Sustainer Home was completed this month and the company is now testing the design.

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Israel Gets a Shipping Container Student Village

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A brand new student village recently opened its doors in the town of Sderot in Israel. What sets it apart from other such villages is the fact that it was built entirely out of used shipping containers. All the work was also done by the students themselves, many with no prior construction experience, under the watchful eye of Ayalim, Israel’s largest youth organization.

Construction started in June 2014 and by early December 2014, the units were ready for habitation. The village was built using 36 recycled shipping containers, which yielded 150 apartment units. The construction was done by 1000 students and pre-army volunteers, who picked up valuable construction skills as they worked. About 300 of these will stay in the village and attend the nearby Sapir Academic College. The units are made available to them for a subsidized rent, so long as they perform 500 hours of community service in Sderot annually.

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The shipping container village is comprised of three separate structures, each rising three stories. The shipping containers used to build them were pretty much left in their original state, at least from the outside, and stacked one atop another much like they would be on a ship while still transporting goods.

On the inside, little suggests the units are made out of shipping containers. The walls were covered in drywall and painted white to give the sense of spaciousness. The units were also fitted with large windows that let in plenty of natural daylight and offer good ventilation. The apartments are comfortably furnished, and contain a fully functional kitchen, living area, bedroom and bathroom.

The main aim of this project was to get young people to stay in the village even after they finish their studies. Apparently the biggest obstacle for people settling and studying in this region of the country is lack of affordable housing, which is what the Ayalim is trying to remedy through this project. It is certainly nice to see large scale cargotecture projects like this start to crop up all over the world and hopefully there will be many more.

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Historic Train Station in Paris To Become World´s Largest Start-Up Incubator

Historic Train Station in Paris To Become World´s Largest Start-Up Incubator

 

(Courtesy Wilmotte et Associés)

 

Paris has its answer to Silicon Valley, with plans to convert an historic train station into the world’s largest home for digital entrepreneurship. Architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte has been entrusted to rehabilitate the landmark building, situated on the southern bank of the river Seine, into a technological hub to accommodate 1,000 start-up companies by the year 2016.

 

 

 

(Courtesy Wilmotte et Associés)

 

The new Halle Freyssinet building will be structured around modular container-based architecture, a nod to the cargo train heritage of the building, and will provide a range of business functions including meeting rooms, spacious co-working areas, a large auditorium, a fab-lab (workshop to create digital prototypes) and a 24-hour restaurant and bar. The ambitious venture is made possible through the Municipality of Paris with joint financing by Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations and French entrepreneur, Xavier Nile.

 

(Courtesy Wilmotte et Associés)

 

If all goes to plan, the new digital incubator will strengthen France’s presence and competitiveness in the tech enterprise market by cultivating an open space for entrepreneurs to grow and share ideas.

 

“Paris is a magical city, a city that attracts people from around the world and where a real energy around digital is developing. But young companies that want to settle there are faced with a lack of affordable, practical and high-speed equipped places.”  Xavier Niel told the newspaper Journal du Dimanche.

 

(Courtesy Wilmotte et Associés)

 

(Courtesy Wilmotte et Associés)

 

(Courtesy Wilmotte et Associés)

(Courtesy Wilmotte et Associés)

WHITNEY STUDIO por LOT-EK

WHITNEY STUDIO por LOT-EK

El pasado año el estudio de arquitectura LOT-EK recibió el encargo de proyectar un nuevo espacio de arte dentro del Whitney Museum of American Art. El Whitney Studio se diseño como un espacio versátil que podía ser usado como espacio para exposiciones temporales, zona para pequeñas conferencias o aula de charlas y clases sobre arte, para adultos, jovenes o familias.

Conocido como el Whitney Studio, la instalación permanecerá allí hasta que el museo se traslade a su nueva sede en el distrito Meatpacking de Manhattan en 2015. El diseño es singular – un espacio de 600 metros cuadrados, compuesto por seis contenedores pintados de negro que forman un espacio de estudio de 17 metros de altura y se aloja en la zona de entresuelo del museo.

El proyecto se compone de 6 contenedores de acero apilados en dos niveles para formar un cubo conciso y minimalista. La estructura se ubica en el lado sur del puente de entrada, complementando y contrastando con el interior de hormigón del museo. El volumen se corta en dos planos diagonales que crean una perforación continua – y una ruptura visual – que se extiende a lo largo de los lados hasta el techo, creando un gran tragaluz. El diseño de las ventanas permiten a los visitantes observar las actividades que se realizan en el interior. El interior de la galería es un espacio abierto, de doble altura, que incluye un altillo triangular para la producción y exhibición de obras de arte.

Los seis contenedores se modificaron, reforzaron y pintaron en una fábrica de Nueva Jersey, posteriormente los módulos se trasladaron al Whitney Museum, donde se ensamblaron cuidadosamente formando este cubo del arte.

Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Vista antes de su montaje en el museo. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Fotografía © Danny Bright.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Conexión con el museo. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Fotografía © Danny Bright.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Emplazamiento en el Whitney Museum. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Fotografía © Danny Bright. Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Detalle del exterior. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Fotografía © Danny Bright. Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Vista del Interior. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Fotografía © Danny Bright.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Vista del Interior, detalle.  Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Fotografía © Danny Bright.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Plano de situación. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Plano de planta baja. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Plano de planta primera. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Plano planta de cubierta. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Sección. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek.Señala encima de la imagen para verla más grande - Emplazamiento en el Whitney Museum. Whitney Studio por Lot-Ek. Fotografía © Danny Bright.

Container Shop-Futurumshop

Futurumshop

Por José Tomás Franco

Arquitectos: AReS Architecten Ubicación: Europaweg 165, Apeldoorn Zuidwest, Holanda Arquitecto A Cargo: Sen Heesen Equipo De Proyecto: Tjeerd Hermsen, Rogier Penning Año Proyecto: 2011 Área Proyecto: 2158 m2 Fotografías: Thea van den Heuvel

En un terreno a las afueras de Apeldoorn, los arquitectos han diseñado un edificio comerical para la tienda Futurumshop, comercializadora de artículos deportivos en línea.

El edificio cuenta con una gran fachada de vidrio que cubre el largo y la altura completa del edificio y un muro que se compone de 12 containers de transporte. Este muro actúa como divisor entre el área de almacén y oficinas, y la zona de servicios generales y técnicos, que incluye una despensa, servicios y una sala de conferencias.

El simbolismo de los contenedores se relaciona con la empresa: una tienda virtual que recibe y despacha miles de productos cada día. Un contenedor marítimo es un símbolo del comercio mundial y la “caja final” en la que se envían los productos.

Las medidas de los containers sirven como punto de partida para el diseño del resto del edificio. Esto generó varias características llamativas, por ejemplo, la altura de las plantas. De esta manera, la estructura y todas las instalaciones se mantienen a la vista.
El muro de contenedores está equipado con logotipos y nombres de los proveedores generando un aspecto lúdico al hall de acceso. Esto se potencia a través del uso de escaleras de acero y puentes elevados que conectan las oficinas 9 metros de altura. Así se genera un gran espacio abierto entre estas dos áreas, que ofrece una vista general a través de toda la longitud del edificio.
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Uno de los “recipientes” contiene la sala de conferencias y se construye totalmente de vidrio, destacando de los demás.

Cortes
Futurumshop / AReS Architecten © Thea van den Heuvel Futurumshop / AReS Architecten © Thea van den HeuvelFuturumshop / AReS Architecten © Thea van den HeuvelFuturumshop / AReS Architecten © Thea van den HeuvelFuturumshop / AReS Architecten © Thea van den HeuvelFuturumshop / AReS Architecten © Thea van den Heuvel
Futurumshop / AReS Architecten © Thea van den HeuvelFuturumshop / AReS Architecten Planta 01Futurumshop / AReS Architecten Planta 03
Futurumshop / AReS Architecten Elevación 01Futurumshop / AReS Architecten Cortes 01